DO NURSES’ OPINIONS MATTER?

Published:September 21, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nurpra.2021.07.022
      Donald Gardenier, DNP, FNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, is a nurse practitioner in gastroenterology and hepatology at Eisenhower Health in Palm Springs, CA. He is also adjunct assistant professor at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH, where he earned his doctorate of nursing practice degree in 2009. Since 2011, he has been the editor of this column, featuring the opinions of nurse practitioners on a broad scope of topics of interest. Dr. Gardenier has an extensive background treating chronic hepatitis C. He completed a clinical fellowship in hepatology sponsored by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City where he worked from 1999 until 2016, most recently as clinical program director and assistant professor of medicine. He has presented and published on numerous topics in liver disease. Dr. Gardenier is a past board member of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and the American College of Nurse Practitioners. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, which named him an Edge Runner for innovation in health care delivery. Dr. Gardenier completed his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing as a National Health Service Corps scholar at the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University in Pleasantville, NY. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from New York University and is a returned Peace Corps volunteer.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic and Personal

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to The Journal for Nurse Practitioners
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Reinhart R.J.
        Nurses continue to rate highest in honesty, ethics.
      1. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.
        • Woods A.D.
        WHO: state of world’s nursing 2020.
      2. Bruni F. Ted Cruz, I’m sorry. New York Times. June 17, 2021.

      3. The Pulitzer Prizes.
      4. Berger M. Herblock, Washington Post columnist with wit and bite, is dead at 91. New York Times. October 9, 2001.

      5. Martin D. Walter Cronkite, 92, dies; trusted voice of TV news. New York Times. July 17, 2009.

        • Achenbach J.
        Did the news media, led by Walter Conkrite, lose the war in Vietnam? Washington Post.
        (May 25, 2018)
        • Sigma Theta Tau International
        The Woodhull study on nursing and the media: health care’s invisible partner.
        Center Nursing Press, 1997
        • Mason D.J.
        • Nixon L.
        • Glickstein B.
        • et al.
        The Woodhull study revisited: nurses’ representation in health news media 20 years later.
        J Nurs Scholarsh. 2018; 50: 695-704
        • Mason D.J.
        • Glickstein B.
        • Westphaln K.
        Journalists’ experiences with using nurses as sources in health news stories.
        Am J Nurs. 2018; 118: 42-50