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Medications in Kidney Disease

Published:October 25, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nurpra.2017.07.023

      Highlights

      • Estimating kidney function is key in medication dosing for kidney patients.
      • Clinical assessment plus estimating equations needed for accurate dosing.
      • Inappropriate dosing in kidney patients causes harm.

      Abstract

      The kidneys are important for eliminating most medications from the body. As kidney function decreases, patients are at increased risk for adverse events when medications are dosed inappropriately. Issues surrounding estimating kidney function along with case reports of inappropriate medication prescribing from different medication classes in kidney patients are highlighted for the nurse practitioner.

      Keywords

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      Biography

      Rebecca Maxson, PharmD, BCPS, is an assistant clinical professor at the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy in Birmingham, AL. She can be reached at [email protected].